Sudan protests: Who is behind them and what do they want? - DW News.

Hundreds of protesters have rallied for a second day in Sudan's capital, Khartoum. They're calling for the transitional government to be dissolved and replaced by a military administration. Demonstrators are angry over what they see as the current government's failures to address the country's political and economic problems. Tension between military and civilian groups is growing.
In a sign of Sudan's deepening political divide, pro-military protesters chanted 'one army, one people' as they marched through Khartoum. They're demanding the interim government step down, and make way for military rule.
Sudan has been undergoing a political transition since autocratic president Omar al-Bashir was overthrown in 2019. The country is ruled by a joint civilian and military council. But the alliance is uneasy - and many Sudanese people have previously called for the military to step back from politics.
In September a failed coup rocked the interim government. Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok called it an 'alarm bell,' as Sudan is drawn deeper into political unrest.
But his warning fell on deaf ears. The interim government is increasingly unpopular, and pro-military demonstrators rallied across the weekend.
Critics say these protests are steered by members of the military - and some government officials have joined in, underscoring divisions between political factions that are tearing holes in the country's fragile transition to democracy.

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