Fans threaten boycott of Qatar World Cup over corruption, human rights - DW News.

It's just a year until the football World Cup kicks off in Qatar. Allegations of vote buying and human rights abuses have marred the run-up to the competition. Some fans are threatening a boycott. But Qatar says it deserves to host the cup.
The stadiums are all but ready with just a year to go until the Qatar World Cup. But many football fans are not yet ready to embrace the tournament.
Human rights groups say many thousands of migrant workers may have died building the stadiums and infrastructure.
They have also criticized the living conditions of workers as well as Qatar's repression of women and homosexuals.
Qatar rejects the number of deaths and says it has done more than any neighboring country to improve worker welfare, including limits on working hours in the heat. But the likes of Amnesty Intentional are not convinced.
Qatar holding FIFA's iconic tournament is also unpopular because of allegations it bought the hosting rights. Despite the US Department of Justice saying so, Qatar denies it.
But the controversies have led these fans in Europe to boycott the tournament. They are planning their own amateur version instead.
National sides such as Germany have also made their feelings clear. But there is no sign any teams will actually boycott the World Cup.
Proponents say Qatar has shown its commitment to football and Western arrogance is at play. Many in the Middle East and Arab World are proud to be hosting a first World Cup and only the second in Asia.
Its gas riches mean Qatar will put on a spectacular tournament but at a heavy price for many.

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