The Apprentice fired candidate Dean Ahmad interview: 'Certain people aren't there for business reasons'.

The latest Apprentice candidate to be fired by Lord Sugar has been revealed – and he’s happy with the way in which it went down.

For the show’s tenth challenge, the candidates were tasked with creating and marketing a brand new fragrance.

Things didn’t end too well for 20-year-old sports management agency owner Dean Ahmad, though, who was sent home after a heated boardroom encounter with Pamela Laird and Lewis Ellis.

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Following his firing, we spoke with Dean about why he wasn’t surprised Lewis turned on him at the end, his frustration with candidates seeking camera time and why he’s feeling good about his final exchange with Lord Sugar.

How does it feel to be leaving before the interview episode?

I’m obviously gutted to be gone, but at the same time, I’m humble for the opportunity. It’s the best thing I’ve ever done.

Why do you think Lord Sugar fired you?

I’m not sure. Maybe he saw my business plan and thought it wasn’t the right time to invest in me, but that doesn’t mean he’ll think the same in the future. I learnt so much going into the process. I was project manager – and twice, let’s not forget that.

Lord Sugar told you to keep in touch as you were leaving the boardroom. How did that feel?

It was nice for him to say it – in my little speech at the end, I said I was young and I’ve got a lot more to show in this world. Hopefully that resonated with him. I’ve been in business since I was 15 – I’m business through and through and have got some big name clients on my board. I’m sure Lord Sugar looked into that. I’d like to say that he sees potential in me and it’s not the last he’s gonna hear from me.

The Apprentice 2019 – Meet the contestants

Show all 16

Dean Ahmad, 20
Scarlett Allen-Horton, 32
Jemelin Artigas, 34
Souleyman Bath, 20

The Apprentice 2019 – Meet the contestants

Dean Ahmad, 20

1/16 Dean Ahmad, 20

Dean founded his sports management agency aged 15 and believes he is "the definition of an entrepreneur", with confidence and emotional intelligence that are "off the charts". He believes his "gift of the gab" could "persuade anyone to do anything".

BBC

Scarlett Allen-Horton, 32

2/16 Scarlett Allen-Horton, 32

Recruitment company owner Scarlett says that her upbeat personality means that people "will often buy into her as a person," but admits that she sometimes struggles to accept help from others. Could this cause fireworks in the show's infamous group tasks?

Jemelin Artigas, 34

3/16 Jemelin Artigas, 34

Network marketing consultant Jemelin claims she is "1000 percent committed" to winning every task but warns that she can be "next-level stubborn" when it comes to getting her own way.

Souleyman Bath, 20

4/16 Souleyman Bath, 20

Para athlete and motivational speaker Souleyman trains with the Great Britain Paralympic team as a sprinter, having been diagnosed with Retina Pigmentosa aged six. "The less sight I have, the more imagination I gain, because what you see is what you see and what you don't see is when the magic begins," he says.

FIRED WEEK THREE

Lewis Ellis, 28

5/16 Lewis Ellis, 28

Lewis is a digital marketing project manager and describes himself as a "maverick", who believes his competitiveness and determination will see him through the process. He adds: "I may not be the smartest guy in the room, but I’ll sure as hell work harder.”

Lubna Farhan, 33

6/16 Lubna Farhan, 33

Finance manager Lubna says she believes she has the "whole package" after turning herself into her own role model. A bookworm, the contestant describes herself as a "dark horse", adding: "I came from a council estate… I have made myself into something good and I’m on my way to becoming something great”.

FIRED WEEK FOUR

Riyonn Farsad, 30

7/16 Riyonn Farsad, 30

Events manager Riyonn invented his own card game which is part of his "little black book full of multi-million-pound ideas”. He says his personality is his best asset, but won't let friends get in the way of coming out on top.

FIRED WEEK FIVE

Shahin Hassan, 36

8/16 Shahin Hassan, 36

Chartered engineer Shahin credits Elon Musk as one of his role models because he “thinks outside the box”, a quality he prides himself in having and thinks that his imagination will make him stand out from the other candidates.

FIRED WEEK ONE

Pamela Laird, 29

9/16 Pamela Laird, 29

Beauty brand owner Pamela describes herself as "feisty and passionate" with a charismatic personality, which enables her to excel in sales. She says: “I love to be the under-estimated person in the room.”

Carina Lepore, 30

10/16 Carina Lepore, 30

Carina owns an artisan bakery. She says she is a natural leader and that people latch onto her to benefit from the influence she carries. She believes it’s “written in the stars” that she’ll be Lord Sugar’s next Apprentice, describing herself as a "pocket rocket" due to her height (5ft 1").

Lottie Lion, 19

11/16 Lottie Lion, 19

Lottie the librarian says she is “very cut throat” and insists that she is no push over. She believes her poise and her “powers of persuasion” are her greatest business qualities, noting that people with bad manners anger her and that she gets frustrated when things don’t adhere to her high standards.

Ryan-Mark Parsons, 19

12/16 Ryan-Mark Parsons, 19

Ryan-Mark is an award-winning public speaker who admires the Queen and describes himself as the "epitome of luxury". Despite believing his best asset to be his ability to “forge a connection with anyone” he adds: "I'm not afraid to be ruthless when it comes to the other candidates."

Iasha Masood, 27

13/16 Iasha Masood, 27

Iasha is an account manager who thinks her “crazy, controversial, eccentric personality” will help her go far as she believes her "natural persona" will help her win. But watch out for her enemies - Masood is not afraid of keeping her friends close but her enemies closer, and she says: "I can read people just by looking at their body language, they won’t realise it until it’s too late – and checkmate”.

Kenna Ngoma, 24

14/16 Kenna Ngoma, 24

Before creating his alcohol-infused ice cream company in 2018, Kenna played semi-professional football for Manchester City before that was cut short by injury in 2013. Kenna believes he is enthusiastic with an “infectious personality”, which he hopes will aid him to befriend the strongest candidates to help him build alliances.

FIRED WEEK TWO

Marianne Rawlins, 36

15/16 Marianne Rawlins, 36

Marianne owns a risk management consultancy and moved from the US to the UK in 2017. She admits that she doesn’t have a filter and may need to “dial down her American-ness” and take a step back, as she says she can be too direct.

Thomas Skinner, 28

16/16 Thomas Skinner, 28

Pillow company owner Thomas started out in business aged 12, with a paper round, and later worked on the markets when he was 16. Since then he has set up his own pillow company, attributing his business success to his “sharp”, “street wise” character.

Dean Ahmad, 20

1/16 Dean Ahmad, 20

Dean founded his sports management agency aged 15 and believes he is "the definition of an entrepreneur", with confidence and emotional intelligence that are "off the charts". He believes his "gift of the gab" could "persuade anyone to do anything".

BBC

Scarlett Allen-Horton, 32

2/16 Scarlett Allen-Horton, 32

Recruitment company owner Scarlett says that her upbeat personality means that people "will often buy into her as a person," but admits that she sometimes struggles to accept help from others. Could this cause fireworks in the show's infamous group tasks?

Jemelin Artigas, 34

3/16 Jemelin Artigas, 34

Network marketing consultant Jemelin claims she is "1000 percent committed" to winning every task but warns that she can be "next-level stubborn" when it comes to getting her own way.

Souleyman Bath, 20

4/16 Souleyman Bath, 20

Para athlete and motivational speaker Souleyman trains with the Great Britain Paralympic team as a sprinter, having been diagnosed with Retina Pigmentosa aged six. "The less sight I have, the more imagination I gain, because what you see is what you see and what you don't see is when the magic begins," he says.

FIRED WEEK THREE

Lewis Ellis, 28

5/16 Lewis Ellis, 28

Lewis is a digital marketing project manager and describes himself as a "maverick", who believes his competitiveness and determination will see him through the process. He adds: "I may not be the smartest guy in the room, but I’ll sure as hell work harder.”

Lubna Farhan, 33

6/16 Lubna Farhan, 33

Finance manager Lubna says she believes she has the "whole package" after turning herself into her own role model. A bookworm, the contestant describes herself as a "dark horse", adding: "I came from a council estate… I have made myself into something good and I’m on my way to becoming something great”.

FIRED WEEK FOUR

Riyonn Farsad, 30

7/16 Riyonn Farsad, 30

Events manager Riyonn invented his own card game which is part of his "little black book full of multi-million-pound ideas”. He says his personality is his best asset, but won't let friends get in the way of coming out on top.

FIRED WEEK FIVE

Shahin Hassan, 36

8/16 Shahin Hassan, 36

Chartered engineer Shahin credits Elon Musk as one of his role models because he “thinks outside the box”, a quality he prides himself in having and thinks that his imagination will make him stand out from the other candidates.

FIRED WEEK ONE

Pamela Laird, 29

9/16 Pamela Laird, 29

Beauty brand owner Pamela describes herself as "feisty and passionate" with a charismatic personality, which enables her to excel in sales. She says: “I love to be the under-estimated person in the room.”

Carina Lepore, 30

10/16 Carina Lepore, 30

Carina owns an artisan bakery. She says she is a natural leader and that people latch onto her to benefit from the influence she carries. She believes it’s “written in the stars” that she’ll be Lord Sugar’s next Apprentice, describing herself as a "pocket rocket" due to her height (5ft 1").

Lottie Lion, 19

11/16 Lottie Lion, 19

Lottie the librarian says she is “very cut throat” and insists that she is no push over. She believes her poise and her “powers of persuasion” are her greatest business qualities, noting that people with bad manners anger her and that she gets frustrated when things don’t adhere to her high standards.

Ryan-Mark Parsons, 19

12/16 Ryan-Mark Parsons, 19

Ryan-Mark is an award-winning public speaker who admires the Queen and describes himself as the "epitome of luxury". Despite believing his best asset to be his ability to “forge a connection with anyone” he adds: "I'm not afraid to be ruthless when it comes to the other candidates."

Iasha Masood, 27

13/16 Iasha Masood, 27

Iasha is an account manager who thinks her “crazy, controversial, eccentric personality” will help her go far as she believes her "natural persona" will help her win. But watch out for her enemies - Masood is not afraid of keeping her friends close but her enemies closer, and she says: "I can read people just by looking at their body language, they won’t realise it until it’s too late – and checkmate”.

Kenna Ngoma, 24

14/16 Kenna Ngoma, 24

Before creating his alcohol-infused ice cream company in 2018, Kenna played semi-professional football for Manchester City before that was cut short by injury in 2013. Kenna believes he is enthusiastic with an “infectious personality”, which he hopes will aid him to befriend the strongest candidates to help him build alliances.

FIRED WEEK TWO

Marianne Rawlins, 36

15/16 Marianne Rawlins, 36

Marianne owns a risk management consultancy and moved from the US to the UK in 2017. She admits that she doesn’t have a filter and may need to “dial down her American-ness” and take a step back, as she says she can be too direct.

Thomas Skinner, 28

16/16 Thomas Skinner, 28

Pillow company owner Thomas started out in business aged 12, with a paper round, and later worked on the markets when he was 16. Since then he has set up his own pillow company, attributing his business success to his “sharp”, “street wise” character.

Lewis turned on you at the end, but you refused to be nasty when you could have easily played it ike that also. Was that a conscious decision?

Certain people in the process haven’t really gone on for business reasons – I think the viewers can judge who for themselves. It could have been really easy for Pamela to play a game, but when Lord Sugar asked her who should be fired, she didn’t say me because she didn’t believe that. Lewis has never really had a business or links to the business world, so yeah, I’ll let the viewers judge it on that front. Also, for a man with a marketing degree to produce something average and... what would you describe it as?

I would probably say “extremely s***”.

I think that’s being nice about it, to be honest with you! If someone paid me to use that bottle, I would turn it down. That’s how bad it was.

Why did your team members not feel confident leaving things in your hands?

I’m not sure, to be honest. I hadn’t actually worked with Lewis since week two, so I think he was trying to point blame and hope for the best. I think it would have been better for him to hold his hands up and admit how bad that product was. Pamela’s worked with me, though, and is very complimentary.

Who do you think is going to win?

From about week two or three, even just living in the house with Scarlett, it became clear to me she’s very sharp, very on the ball. She reminds me of Karren Brady. You saw it in this task when Lord Sugar praised her – she’s never worked in marketing or branding before, and yet she created a product like that. In contrast, Lewis has got a marketing degree and produced a pretty shocking product.

You worked quite closely with Lottie, who is one of this year’s more controversial candidates. How did you find it?

Yeah, she’s hard work and I think – as I said earlier – it’s very obvious that certain people are on the show for non-business reasons. I think what annoyed people, and certainly me, was that people played up to the cameras; they’d be one person off it and another on. People used to find that irritating. But in business, you’ve got to be able to work with people you you do like, people you don’t like and people with big personalities. I’m used to that and it sort of showed in the music task. I thought I put her in her place.

‘The Apprentice’ candidate Lottie Lion (BBC)

Is it frustrating to leave earlier than a candidate who might not be there for business reasons?

No, it’s not frustrating, I have no regrets. It’s Lord Sugar’s process and his money. He made his decision and he’s right in his own way. It’s a lot of money, so he’s obviously gonna test people in different ways. Maybe I was a couple of years too early, I don’t know. He obviously saw something in me.

What was your personal highlight?

Probably the music task; I think we smashed that – I was right in my element. Also, when I broke the bed in the house. I ran over to Lewis’s bed thinking he was going to be naked underneath the covers with the cameras on, but he obviously wasn’t. So he rugby tackled me onto my bed and it broke in half. The day after, when Lord Sugar came into the house to tell us about the next task, I thought he was there to bill me and Lewis for the broken bed! Thankfully, he wasn’t. That was quite funny.

Watch more

What prompted you to apply for the series?

I’ve always loved the show, but mainly I’ve always been very entrepreneurial and wanted to scale up my business – and who better to do that with than Lord Sugar?

What’s next for you?

Well, I’m 20 and have been doing my sports management business for five years now. I’ve got some very big names – guys who play for England right now. I’m just working hard to grow my business and, as I said, this isn’t the last the business world has heard from me.

The Apprentice continues every Wednesday at 9m on BBC One

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