40 countries back UN resolution on occupied Crimea, - Deputy Foreign Minister Kyslytsia

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40 countries back UN resolution on occupied Crimea, - Deputy Foreign Minister Kyslytsia

As reported by Censor.NET, Ukraine's Deputy Foreign Minister Serhii Kyslytsia told Ukrinform as he arrived in New York to drum up the document.

"As of now we have four dozen countries that have joined the co-sponsors of the resolution submitted to implement the initiative of President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko, as he said during the general debate of the UN General Assembly in September," Kyslytsia said.

The deputy minister said that the Ukrainian team had intensified its efforts to promote the document among the UN member states.

Read more: Umerov: Crimea's status should be determined by indigenous residents - Crimean Tatars

"Numerous bilateral meetings are being held with our partners and not only to get as much support during the voting as possible," the Ukrainian diplomat said.

He also added that the document's rhetoric was "quite strong and strident with clear unambiguous wording while its purpose is to protect the rights and freedoms of citizens on the Ukrainian peninsula."

The diplomat also expects leaders of the Crimean Tatar people Mustafa Dzhemilev, Akhtem Chiygoz and Rustem Umerov to arrive in New York soon. "They will also join the resolution's promotion in the UN," Kyslytsia said.

Read more: Chiygoz: There are no Crimeans other than Ukraine's citizens living in Crimea

If compared to the resolution on the Situation of human rights in the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol (Ukraine), approved by the UN General Assembly last December, the new document contains a number of new requirements for the Russian Federation aimed at ensuring compliance with its international obligations in the context of promotion of de-occupation of the Ukrainian peninsula

First, the resolution confirms there is an international armed conflict between Ukraine and Russia which is particularly important in the context of leveling Russia's arguments that there is allegedly an internal conflict in Ukraine.

Second, the document condemns the retroactive application of Russia's own laws in the occupied territory as well as the fact that Ukrainian citizens living in Crimea are forced to gain Russian citizenship. The draft resolution also recognizes Russia's lack of jurisdiction on the peninsula, which makes its decisions and laws in Crimea insignificant.

Third, the draft resolution demands that Russia should implement an interim decision of the International Court of Justice on restoring the rights and freedoms of citizens of Ukraine on the peninsula.

The document also contains a request to the UN Secretary-General to coordinate the actions of the UN bodies with a view to implementing the provisions of this resolution.